how to assert that your custom hook didn’t throw

This micro blog entry is for those who: use renderHook from @testing-library/react-hooks to test their own custom hooks want to assert that the custom hook did not throw So, by instinct, one probably would do sth along this line: The reason why the above approach doesn’t work is quite obvious, if you think about it. […]

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TypeScript Node.js testing tips

Situation 1 Use mocha in server-side TypeScript projects with compilerOptions.paths in tsconfig.json ? Then we need: mocha tsconfig-paths ts-node { “ts-node”: { “files”: true } } in the tsconfig.json file (see more here) Depending on how we import our modules around in the codebase, point (4) above may not always be needed. In one of […]

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GIT_SSH_COMMAND

I have a number of git repos on remote systems (e.g. GitLab) where my laptop’s pub key is already registered for a certain other account not associated with the aforementioned git repos. Thus, I usually have to GIT_SSH_COMMAND=’ssh -i <path/to/some/private/key>’ git <command> so as to communicate with these repos under the correct identity. I might […]

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make a string url-safe

When running devops scripts (among other things), we often need to get a url-safe representation of an arbitrary string. This is commonly known as “url slug” by the average netizens. As my JavaScript is better than my bash, and npx is more universally available than my capability to master both Windows and Linux shell scripts, […]

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Using mocha with ES6+ spec files

Okay, so the problem is obvious: we want to use mocha to run spec .js files written in ES6+ ( very likely with async await being utilised ‘cuz everybody loves ’em 😉 ). I’ll go ahead and state it upfront that: there is nothing special or challenging about this. I’m blogging this only for the sheer reason […]

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